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Where to Stay, Play and Invest in Nashville

The Worth guide to businesses, hotels, restaurants and experiences in Nashville, Tenn.

BY WORTH | Cities | May 14, 2019
Mockingbird Nashville Mockingbird Nashville. Photo by Emily Dorio
In addition to being one of America’s most dynamic cities, Nashville, Tenn. is also in the process of transforming into a global city. Worth is bringing you some of the businesses, hotels, restaurants and attractions to discover when you head to Music City.

Business 

Warner Music Nashville

Since its founding in 2009 as part of the expansion plan of Warner Music Group, Warner Music Nashville has signed country music power players such as Hunter Hayes and Brett Eldredge. It’s poised to bring 175 new jobs to the city in the next year thanks to a new financial services division. 20 Music Square E., 615.748.8000, warnermusicnashville.com

Citizen Kitchens

Dubbing itself a “food business incubator,” Citizen Kitchens is a culinary one-stop shop for local food entrepreneurs by providing access to licensed kitchen space, storage, commercial equipment and sales and business support—for a small fee. A second location is slated to open in east Nashville this summer. 4611 Alabama Ave., citizenkitchens@gmail.com, citizenkitchens.com

Jumpstart Foundry

This locally based healthcare innovation fund supports early-stage healthcare companies across the U.S. It has now partnered with the Nashville Entrepreneur Center for an initiative to make Nashville a hub for healthcare entrepreneurs. 604 Gallatin Ave., Suite 211, 615.810.9316, jsf.co

Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce

This 131-year-old organization may be the only chamber of commerce that proudly advertises: “We sparkwe rockwe partywe buildwe love.” 211 Commerce St., Suite 100, 615.743.3000, nashvillechamber.com

The Nashville Entrepreneur Center

Founded in 2007, the NEC aims to connect entrepreneurs with resources and advisors to help them start and build companies. As befits its hometown, the center focuses on music, publishing and healthcare technology. 41 Peabody St., 615.873.1257, ec.co

READ MORE: How Nashville is Transforming Itself Into a Global City

Hotels

The 404 Hotel

Housed in a former shipping container, the 404 has all of five rooms. If that sounds cool to you, you’re going to love the new Nashville. 404 12th Ave. S., 615.242.7404, the404nashville.com

The Hermitage Hotel

The Beaux Arts-style hotel where Nixon, Kennedy, Johnson and other presidents stayed. Check out the men’s room at the Oak Bar—it’s an architectural gem. 231 6th Ave. N., 615.244.3121, thehermitagehotel.com

Hutton Hotel

A boutique hotel with a java bar and techno touches like room key-controlled lights and digital shower thermostats. 1808 West End Ave., 615.340.9333, huttonhotel.com

Union Station

Originally a circa 1900 train station, then converted into a hotel in the 1980s, Union Station is now a part of Marriott’s Autograph Collection. 1001 Broadway, 615.726.1001, unionstationhotelnashville.com

Kimpton Aertson Hotel

Nestled in the midtown corridor, this boutique hotel strikes a balance between local and exotic with an eclectic collection of artwork from local Hatch Show Print paired with pieces from European and Asian artists. 2021 Broadway, 615.340.6376, kimptonhotels.com

Noelle

Southern charm meets 1930s Art Deco in this classic Printers Alley hotel. The Music City’s evolution over the past half-century is reflected in Noelle’s emergence as a hub for the New South’s creative community. 200 4th Ave. N., 615.649.5000, noellenashville.com

Thompson Nashville

Opened in 2016 in the Gulch, the 224-room Thompson Nashville offers unique local touches like vinyl on loan from Jack White’s Third Man Records and bespoke jeans that guests can order from Imogene + Willie and have fitted in their rooms. 401 11th Ave. S., 615.262.6000, thompsonhotels.com

21c Nashville

Housed in the Gray & Dudley building that was constructed in 1900, 21c is both a 124-room hotel and a 10,500-square-foot contemporary art museum. Guided docent tours of current exhibitions are offered every Wednesday and Friday. 221 2nd Ave. N., 615.610.6400, 21cmuseumhotels.com/nashville

READ MORE: Destination 2018: Nashville

Restaurants

Arnold’s Country Kitchen

It’s all about the classic “meat and three” at Arnold’s. The concept is simple and the execution spot-on—fried chicken, mac n’ cheese, creamed corn, strawberry pie, banana pudding…. Not great for the body, but excellent for the soul. 605 Eighth Ave. S., 615.256.4455, arnoldscountrykitchen.com

The Catbird Seat

A creation of local hospitality entrepreneurs Ben and Max Goldberg, the Catbird Seat is high-concept: 22 seats, one seating per night four nights a week, and a tasting menu of whatever chefs Will Aghajanian and Liz Johnson feels like making that night. 1711 Division St., 615.810.8200, thecatbirdseatrestaurant.com

Mas Tacos Por Favor

A meaningful list of outstanding Nashville restaurants would include dozens, but if you have to narrow it down, Mas Tacos is essential. Starting life as a food truck, the East Nashville restaurant serves creative Mexican food with a twist, like cast-iron chicken tacos and fried avocado tacos. 732 Mcferrin Ave., facebook.com/mastacos, 615.543.6271

Folk

Philip Krajeck, chef/owner of the widely acclaimed Rolf and Daughters, opened this highly anticipated pizza-centric local hangout last April. The menu features a variety of sophisticated takes on classics, such as lamb meatballs and clams, sopressata and fermented potatoes on pizza. 823 Meridian St., 615.610.2595, goodasfolk.com

Henrietta Red

Offering a simple, fresh menu of contemporary dishes, this Germantown restaurant focuses on changeable, vegetable-based cuisine. With a variety of seafood, an oyster bar and a curated cocktail menu, it’s the perfect place for a dinner for two. If you’d like a more customized experience, there’s a private dining space and elegant event services available. 1200 4th Ave. N., 615.490.8042, henriettared.com

The Mockingbird Nashville

Two master chefs’ vision—a sophisticated, upscale version of the American diner—has become a hub of activity in Nashville. Chef Maneet Chauhan, of Chauhan Ale & Masala House, together with partner and executive chef Brian Riggenbach and partner and general manager Mikey Corona have created a menu inspired by a classic diner, giving comfort food an elegant and refined twist. 121A 12th Ave. N., 615.741.9900, mockingbirdnashville.com

Prince’s Hot Chicken

If you’re looking to try some real, authentic Nashville cuisine, Prince’s is a must. The historic joint has been around for nearly 100 years, and its signature dish is hot (read spicy) chicken. It’s one of the best meals in town, so don’t miss out on this famed down-home cuisine. 5814 Nolensville Pike, 615.810.9388, princeshotchicken.com

READ MORE: Expanding the Brand

Experiences

Bluebird Cafe

The Bluebird calls itself a “listening room,” which is a terrific description. A dinner-only café, Bluebird is really a place for songwriters to play music with other songwriters before an appreciative audience of about 70 guests. It’s intimate, unpolished and, when everything clicks, absolutely magical. 4104 Hillsboro Pike, 615.383.1461, bluebirdcafe.com

Country Music Hall of Fame

This is a living museum that does an outstanding job of preserving and curating cultural history while simultaneously demonstrating that country music is alive and well. Visitors could easily spend a day immersed in the sounds of a genre of music that pulls together so many threads of the American tapestry. 222 Fifth Ave. S., 615.416.2001, countrymusichalloffame.org

Ryman Auditorium

Like Red Rocks, Fillmore West, CBGB or Massey Hall, this is one of popular music’s grand cathedrals. Never mind who’s performing: If you can see a show here, see a show here. 116 Fifth Ave. N., 116 Fifth Ave. N., 615.889.3060, ryman.com

Frist Art Museum

Since debuting in 2001, the Frist has maintained a top spot in the evolving local visual arts scene. Current and upcoming exhibits include: Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera and Mexican Modernism from the Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection and Murals of North Nashville Now. 919 Broadway, 615.244.3340, fristartmuseum.org

Grand Ole Opry

Having been housed in six different venues including the Ryman Auditorium and finally the Grand Ole Opry House, the Opry is an institution of American music that’s going strong after 90 years. See a show or book a backstage tour, and prepare to witness a part of history. 2804 Opryland Drive, 800.733.6779, opry.com

The Standard at the Smith House

Built in the 1840s, the Smith House has been reinvented, and now it’s a private club, cigar bar and live event space catering to high net worth individuals. Although it’s members only (with a $3,300 yearly fee), nonmembers are free to dine in the restaurant. 167 Rosa L. Parks Blvd., 615.254.1277, smithhousenashville.com

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